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Offline WTF_Yuppie

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EA simply can't explain lunar eclipses
« on: December 08, 2020, 05:43:23 PM »
There's a section in the WIKI - https://wiki.tfes.org/Lunar_Eclipse_due_to_Electromagnetic_Acceleration - discussing lunar eclipses caused by EA.  The premise is that a full moon happens when the moon travels " "out of bounds," beyond the vertical rays of the Sun."

This is fairly easy to disprove by simply finding a full moon that occurs further from the sun than a lunar eclipse.

Jan 21, 2019, a full lunar eclipse occurred at 5:12 UTC.  At 5:12 UTC the moon was above Cuba at approximately 20.2 deg N, 75.16 deg. W. seen here:



At that time, the sun would have traveled 31 days from the solstice and covered 8 deg. placing it at 15.5 deg south.  Do the math on the flat earth model and you have them separated by 69.8 + 90 +15.5 = 175.3 deg.

The previous full moon occurred occurred very near Honolulu, HI Dec. 22, 2018.  At that time the moon was at approximately 20.8 deg N, 157.93 deg W seen here:



At that time, the sun is 1 day past the winter solstice placing it at 23.24 deg south.  Do the math on the flat earth model and you have them separated by 69.2 + 90 + 23.24 = 182.44 deg.

As you can see, the full moon occurred over 7 deg. further from the sun than the lunar eclipse.  In the FE theory of EA this places the lunar eclipse occurring with the moon well within the verticle upreach of the suns rays.

« Last Edit: December 08, 2020, 08:02:36 PM by WTF_Seriously »
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: EA simply can't explain lunar eclipses
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2020, 06:44:33 PM »
It might be possible for an event where the Sun and Full Moon are more than 180 degrees N-S longitude, without eclipsing.

Here is a quick example:

Black Circle = Sun Path around the Earth, say over the equator. Moon path not depicted. Moon may be following a similar, but not exact circle.

Red Circle = Total extent of the extended rays of the Sun (after they curve back upwards) with a radius about the diameter of the black circle (my guess, may differ).



Top Blue Arrow = It is possible for the Full Moon to be not exactly in the eclipsing region, yet a little further south so that it's 182 degrees longitude from the Sun at its maximum southernly point if you count up the longitude degrees from the North Pole

Of course, the sun is not to scale. If the above image was vectorized you could zoom in and perhaps find a spot closer to the midpoint eclipse area on the right side where a small 32 mile diameter Moon could fit and where its maximum southernly point just skirts by a Lunar Eclipse.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2020, 09:08:42 PM by Tom Bishop »

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Offline WTF_Yuppie

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Re: EA simply can't explain lunar eclipses
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2020, 08:34:50 PM »
It might be possible for an event where the Sun and Full Moon are more than 180 degrees N-S longitude, without eclipsing.

Here is a quick example:

Black Circle = Sun Path around the Earth, say over the equator. Moon path not depicted. Moon may be following a similar, but not exact circle.

Red Circle = Total extent of the extended rays if the Sun (after they curve back upwards) with a radius about the diameter of the black circle (my guess, may differ).



Top Blue Arrow = It is possible for the Full Moon to be not exactly in the eclipsing region, yet a little further south so that it's 182 degrees longitude from the Sun at its maximum southernly point if you count up the longitude degrees from the North Pole

Of course, the sun is not to scale. If the above image was vectorized you could zoom in and perhaps find a spot closer to the midpoint eclipse area on the right side where a small 32 mile diameter Moon could fit and where its maximum southernly point just skirts by a Lunar Eclipse.

I won't try to disect this except to say your geometry and premise are correct.  So let's look at further detail.

For the Jan. 2019 eclipse I posted, the solar noon preceded the lunar meridian by 12 hours.  It took me a bit to find it, but for the preceding Dec. 2018 full moon the location with solar noon preceding lunar meridian by 12 hours was at Wudwin, Muyanmar (I admit that I was off with my previous location of the fullest moon) seen here:



This occurs at a lattitude .3 degrees north of the Honolulu location I gave earlier.  So a slight mathematical adjustment in the FE favor puts the distance at 182.1 degrees.  In both cases, the sun would be at the exact same rotational angle from the moon.  In other words both images would plot the same sun moon orientation on the illustration you provided. This rules out any sun/moon angular distance differences in the two occurrences.  So, this yields that with the sun and moon at equal distances, a lunar eclipse occurs with the moon more than 7 degrees nearer the sun than the full moon.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2020, 12:50:24 AM by WTF_Seriously »
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University