Offline Round fact

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What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« on: May 04, 2016, 10:53:45 PM »
Wiki says the sun is about 3,000 miles above the FE model. But I can find no answer to how far the the stars and planets are thought to be above the FE.

So can someone please tell me?

Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2016, 12:19:46 AM »
I think the consensus is that the stars aren't actual physical objects, rather a luminary. They are not believed to be distant suns each with their own solar system, which is a relatively recent concept.

geckothegeek

Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2016, 03:53:27 AM »
Of course FE's have many different answers.
Some I have read.
(1) The stars are just beyond the sun and just below the dome.
(2) The stars are just  tiny specks of light from holes in the dome.
(3) The stars are just reflections of things on the earth.
(4) The stars are really holograms projected on the dome.....By NASA of course !
(5) Planets do not exist.
(6) The earth is not a planet.

I am just recalling these from things I have read on these two FE websites. FE's please correct  any errors in the above !
« Last Edit: May 05, 2016, 04:04:29 AM by geckothegeek »

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2016, 04:04:17 AM »
I think the consensus is that the stars aren't actual physical objects, rather a luminary. They are not believed to be distant suns each with their own solar system, which is a relatively recent concept.
There's always "the Wiki"
Quote
Stars
The sun, moon, and stars are all rotating around a central point over the North Pole. The underlying cause for this rotation is a vast cornucopia of stellar systems orbiting around its center of attraction - an imaginary point of shared attraction. This is an extrapolated and more complex binary star movement. Think of a binary (two) star system which moves around an invisible common barycenter. Now add a third body which shares that common center of attraction. Now a fourth. When we add enough bodies the system looks like a swirling multiple system.
lots more in the Wiki, Stars. Make of that what you will!

Offline Round fact

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2016, 11:25:53 AM »
In other words not even Wiki can help here. I see  this as a major hole in the "theory" The nigh sky is basic. Polaris' altitude is important. But no one in FET can or so far has bothered to address the question.

Offline Unsure101

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2016, 02:02:43 PM »
In other words not even Wiki can help here. I see  this as a major hole in the "theory" The nigh sky is basic. Polaris' altitude is important. But no one in FET can or so far has bothered to address the question.
And why do you think that is?

Offline Round fact

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2016, 02:15:09 PM »
In other words not even Wiki can help here. I see  this as a major hole in the "theory" The nigh sky is basic. Polaris' altitude is important. But no one in FET can or so far has bothered to address the question.
And why do you think that is?

Because this "theory" is not well thought out. And what is posted is, well fantasy

İntikam

Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2016, 07:15:44 AM »
I believe the stars are there. Meteors and asteroids actually are stars.

The stars that we know them actually as "shooting meteors".

So we can easily calculate which altitude are they on. It is enough to follow a meteor since start falling down to its fall down to land. observe and do the math.

I can't join youtube now because of the ruthless dictator Erdoghan forbidden us. If you watch and say me about an average time for a meteorid falling down time i can easily say what altitude the stars.

My guess is the stars are a few closer to earth than comparison the sun and moon. But generally the stars, sun and the moon about are on near altitude. Probably some of them closer and some of them far away to earth than comparison to sun and moon.

If most of FE's calculated the altitude of the sun is 3.000 miles it shows the stars are about 3.000 miles altitude too. for accurate results, you need to make the observation and the calculation.
« Last Edit: May 06, 2016, 07:31:39 AM by İntikam »

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Offline Jura-Glenlivet

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2016, 09:09:11 AM »

I love meteor showers, there is a small one at the moment (Eta Aquarids),
Question, if they are the “stars falling” when I have sat for a few hours watching the Perseids in August and they are falling at 30-50 an hour (200-500 apparently in a good year) why isn’t there a gap in the star field, why are all the constellations still intact?

Incidentally, from observation (very zetetic) they don’t reach the ground, in all my years of watching them not one has reached the ground, try going out tonight and having a look there may be a few left over and nothing beats direct observation.
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

Offline Round fact

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2016, 10:20:56 AM »
Okay. Polaris is "about" 3,000 miles above the FE North Pole.

This then means at that furtherest spot FROM the North Pole, Polaris is 7 degrees about the horizon at all time and can be seen. But for some reason in FET it becomes invisible below the Equator.

So why does this happen, other than the most obvious reason backed by the math, that the Earth is round?

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Offline Pete Svarrior

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2016, 01:14:49 PM »
So why does this happen, other than the [hypothetical assumption] that the Earth is round?
Electromagnetic acceleration.
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we already addressed it.
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<Parsifal> I like looking at Chinese Wikipedia with Noto installed
<Parsifal> I don't understand any of it but the symbols look nice

Offline Round fact

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2016, 01:20:27 PM »
So why does this happen, other than the [hypothetical assumption] that the Earth is round?
Electromagnetic acceleration.

Electromagnet acceleration makes stars invisible?

You're going to need to explain that is more detail, because just saying it is XXXXXXX does not make it so. The rest of math disagrees.

İntikam

Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2016, 01:23:07 PM »
Light refraction causes invisible The Polaris for far places.  I can explain with this drawing, if you want i do that. :)

İntikam

Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2016, 01:27:24 PM »
3.000 miles not so far. Think Polaris as sun. When sun becomes far away, then we see it as sunset from ground level. alike polaris is about on the axis the earth. You see it at 90 degree on the top when you on North Pole, and the degree increases when you far away from North pole. At a point Polaris be invisible when you far enough away.

Offline Round fact

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Re: What is the altitude of the stars above the FE?
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2016, 03:36:36 PM »
3.000 miles not so far. Think Polaris as sun. When sun becomes far away, then we see it as sunset from ground level. alike polaris is about on the axis the earth. You see it at 90 degree on the top when you on North Pole, and the degree increases when you far away from North pole. At a point Polaris be invisible when you far enough away.

3000 miles IS far when you are talking about viewing it from any distance on the FE. At no point on the FE would Polaris appear LESS than 7 degrees ABOVE the surface. Refraction would at BEST make it appear at not LESS than 6.5 degrees ABOVE the surface. Keep in mind that this if for as far away from the North Pole as you can get. On the Equator the angles would be BIGGER, NOT SMALLER, and refraction would also have a smaller effect.

Try this link. http://www.csgnetwork.com/righttricalc.html Play with the height of the sun/moon/stars and the distances form right under them  to out as far as the "Ice Wall"  It proves that at night Polaris can be seen from the "Ice Wall." And it proves the Sun would shine on ALL of the FE 24 hours a day.

For the calculation of refraction see; http://wise-obs.tau.ac.il/~eran/Wise/Util/Refraction.html