I mean, no matter how far the Sun from where I stand on Earth, the ray should always catch me, right? Unless, the sun moves below the Earth.

This is the only thing that prevents me from completely agree with the theory.

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Online Tron

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Re: Why can't I always see the sun if the sun is always above the earth?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2022, 01:43:25 PM »
I see your point.  Why can't you just see the Sun and every other celestrial object 24/7 with a big enough telescope... 

The answer is there's a few things which may explain this...   Perspective, or the natural tendancy for distant objects to appear lower to a viewer, atmospheric interference - like fog except over 1000's of miles, or refraction which is the bending of light or images off the atmosphere...  The below link offer's an example and other ideas/objections to consider.

See "Comprehensive explanation of sunsets" https://forum.tfes.org/index.php?topic=19650.0
From the surface Earth looks flat.  From space Earth looks round.  Now what?

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Offline stack

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Re: Why can't I always see the sun if the sun is always above the earth?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2022, 07:27:47 PM »
I see your point.  Why can't you just see the Sun and every other celestrial object 24/7 with a big enough telescope... 

The answer is there's a few things which may explain this...   Perspective, or the natural tendancy for distant objects to appear lower to a viewer, atmospheric interference - like fog except over 1000's of miles, or refraction which is the bending of light or images off the atmosphere...  The below link offer's an example and other ideas/objections to consider.

See "Comprehensive explanation of sunsets" https://forum.tfes.org/index.php?topic=19650.0

Just some potential issues with the explanations:

- Perspective: The problem with perspective is that objects. , as they gain distance from the observer, decrease visually decrease in size. The Sun does not as it's making its way across the sky toward setting at night time. It does not visually decrease in size.
- Fog: For fog to be a reason why the Sun disappears, this fog phenomenon would have to be present everywhere on earth, for every viewer, everyday and timed perfectly to expected day and night.
- Refraction: Refraction is variable. Can be light, can be strong, can be non-existent. Depends on the environment. Again, we bump up against this refraction phenomenon would have to be present everywhere on earth, for every viewer, everyday and timed perfectly to expected day and night.

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Offline Pete Svarrior

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Re: Why can't I always see the sun if the sun is always above the earth?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2022, 07:34:19 PM »
I mean, no matter how far the Sun from where I stand on Earth, the ray should always catch me, right?
Not really. Generally speaking, our little corner of FET tends to believe that light rays do not travel in "straight" lines. This differentiates us from other FE groups and, depending on their mood and time of day, RE supporters.

Have a look at https://wiki.tfes.org/Electromagnetic_Acceleration - the massive tl;dr is that the observed behaviour is not too different from RET. RE'ers are not wrong in thinking that something is curved, they've just got the wrong culprit.

This is the only thing that prevents me from completely agree with the theory.
Please drop the silly act. It's not fooling anyone, and it's only making you less likeable.
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we already addressed it.
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Offline Tumeni

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Re: Why can't I always see the sun if the sun is always above the earth?
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2022, 09:31:05 PM »
... the natural tendancy for distant objects to appear lower to a viewer

... only if the observer is below said objects. If they are all of the same height, such as the oft-cited row of lamp posts, they would appear to rise in the observer's field of view, not appear lower.
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Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
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Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?

Online GoldCashew

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Re: Why can't I always see the sun if the sun is always above the earth?
« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2022, 01:58:13 AM »
I mean, no matter how far the Sun from where I stand on Earth, the ray should always catch me, right? Unless, the sun moves below the Earth.

This is the only thing that prevents me from completely agree with the theory.


As TFES theory of EA (electromagnetic acceleration) profers the bending of light which would help explain why one can't always see the small spotlight Sun (with Sunrise and Sunsets) no matter where they stand on a flat earth.... there is still the open and unresolved question as to why/how the Sun projects it's bendy light onto the Earth's surface in a non-uniform pattern (as depicted by TFES animation model)? What causes this non-uniformity of bendy light?

« Last Edit: November 27, 2022, 02:01:12 AM by GoldCashew »

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Offline Tumeni

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Re: Why can't I always see the sun if the sun is always above the earth?
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2022, 07:20:55 PM »
... the natural tendancy for distant objects to appear lower to a viewer

... only if the observer is below said objects. If they are all of the same height, such as the oft-cited row of lamp posts, they would appear to rise in the observer's field of view, not appear lower.

With the observer below the lamp tops, they appear to descend to his eye level;



With the observer above them, they appear to ascend to his eye level;



=============================
Not Flat. Happy to prove this, if you ask me.
=============================

Nearly all flat earthers agree the earth is not a globe.

Nearly?