Offline WTF_Seriously

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Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« on: November 17, 2020, 03:35:45 PM »
FET explains sunrise-sunset, moonrise-moonset with the theory of EA.  In addtion, EA is also given as the driver for the lunar phase cycle - https://wiki.tfes.org/Electromagnetic_Acceleration#Lunar_Phases

In the FE model, the sun is farthest away from the moon at the full moon.  At that time, the sun's rays are powerful enough to illuminate the moon.  This would mandate that at all phases of the lunar cycle, the sun's rays are powerful enough to illuminate the moon as empirical observation verifies. 

Also at this time, the moon is viewable from moonrise to moonset. This is true at every location on the earth plane.  Even at the extreme northern lattitudes a full moon can be witnessed.  What this observation means is that even when the EA effect is at its most extreme (object at its farthest viewing distance) the reflection of the sun's light off the moon can be witnessed.

This being the case, how does FET explain the fact that one day a month the moon doesn't rise in the extreme northern lattitudes.  The RE model explains this phenomenon quite easily.


Note:  In my orginal post I mistakenly typed UA instead of EA.  The post has been corrected.  My apologies for any confusion.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2020, 05:12:56 PM by WTF_Seriously »
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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2020, 05:46:02 PM »
I'll add a second post to this same subject which I struggle to find a FE explanation for.

The moon travels a path nearly along a constant lattitude as it completes an orbit.  This is a measureable property. This measurable property dictates that the distance from the moon to the north pole is nearly constant throughout its orbit. As alluded to in the original topic post, this would mean that the EA effect of the moon's reflection would be nearly constant throughout its orbit.

Is it possible to explain this North Pole phenomon:

"Near the new Moon phase, the Moon is near the Sun and therefore never rises during the winter. As the Moon approaches full, it will start to pop up above the horizon. Eventually near the full Moon phase it will be high enough in the sky to stay up all day and circle like the Sun in the video above. The elevation of the circle will rise as the Moon becomes completely full and then start to decrease until it begins to dip below the horizon. Eventually the Moon will stop rising at all as it gets close enough to the new phase. The cycle then repeats." - http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/our-solar-system/46-our-solar-system/the-moon/observing-the-moon/127-is-the-moon-always-visible-during-winter-on-the-north-pole-intermediate

with flat earth theory?  Again, the RE model explains this fairly easily.
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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2020, 08:18:24 AM »
Look at the path of the Moon when the Sun is in the North or South in the illustrations I provided. The Moon will move between the Tropic of Capricorn or the Tropic of Cancer over the course of its 29.5 day lunar month. Every ~15 days it will go between the North-South extremes.

Quote
As you said, when it is Full Moon under the FE-EA Theory the Moon is furthest from the Sun in its lunar month circuit.

When the Sun is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn, the Full Moon is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer. The extreme North will see a Perpetual Full Moon.



When the Sun is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer, the Full Moon is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn. The extreme North will not see the Full Moon rise or set throughout the day, as it is too far away.




« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 05:21:55 PM by Tom Bishop »

Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2020, 04:33:23 PM »
Thank you for the discussion, Tom.


When the Sun is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn, the Full Moon is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer. The extreme North will see a Perpetual Full Moon.

When the Sun is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer, the Full Moon is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn. The extreme North will not see the Full Moon rise or set throughout the day, as it is too far away.


These two statements are not completely accurate.  Everyone is familiar with the seasonal cycle of the Sun as it travels north-south over 365 days.  Fewer are familiar with the fact that the moon does the same thing except the N-S range is farther and the period is 18.6 years.  This is an observable and measured characteristic.  As such, the latitude of the lunar elliptic changes a little over 6 degrees a year not Cancer to Capricorn and back.

Even if they are true, they don't address the phenomenon I'm discussing.  The phenomenon is not seasonal.  It occurs every lunar cycle.  My second post is similar. It is a lunar cycle phenomenon not a seasonal one.  Edited from original post:  After reviewing Tom's post a little more, I would retract this statement if true.

"At higher latitudes, there will be a period of at least one day each month when the Moon does not rise, but there will also be a period of at least one day each month when the Moon does not set. This is similar to the seasonal behaviour of the Sun, but with a period of 27.2 days instead of 365 days."  - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit_of_the_Moon

Edited to add:  I'll revisit this post at the full moon Nov. 30.  I will capture the image from the moon calendar for Quito, Ecuador.  Being on the equator, if what you're saying is true then the angle of the full moon would be to the North.  At the full moon I believe you will see that the angle will be sourthernly just as it is now.



« Last Edit: December 04, 2020, 05:37:59 PM by WTF_Seriously »
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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2020, 04:59:32 PM »
Here's what I'm referring to:

I had placed an Imgur image here but deleted it without thinking about the ramifications to my posts here.  Sorry for that



https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/phases/usa/prudhoe-bay

Simple explanation, rotating sphere with axial tilt and moon orbiting with an inclination of 5 degrees.

Not so simple explanation, flat earth with orbiting body that changes orbital radius and velocity significantly over the period of 27 days bound by the fact that even at it's elliptic of largest measured radius it can be viewed rising and setting.

Edited to add: I'm not patient enough to spend the time to think of every point that a post surfaces and include them all in the original post.  What is important to this moon calendar is that this phenomenon happens every month, not just at the soltices and that the all day-none moon cycles occur at different phases not just full and new throughout the year.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2020, 05:39:56 PM by WTF_Seriously »
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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2020, 04:47:24 PM »

Quote
As you said, when it is Full Moon under the FE-EA Theory the Moon is furthest from the Sun in its lunar month circuit.

When the Sun is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn, the Full Moon is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer. The extreme North will see a Perpetual Full Moon.




Let's assume for a moment this is always true.  So, the closer the full moon falls to the soltice the nearer the north pole it is.  It would lead then that the closer the full moon occurs to the solstice, the more days of perpetual moon we should have .  What we see though, doesn't correlate.

In 2018 at Prudhoe Bay, the full moon fell on Dec. 22.  There were two days of perpetual moon that month.  This year, the full moon falls on Dec. 29 yet there are 6 days of perpetual moon this year.

You can find any amount of data you want here: https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/usa/prudhoe-bay?month=12&year=2020
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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2020, 11:33:20 PM »

When the Sun is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn, the Full Moon is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer. The extreme North will see a Perpetual Full Moon.

When the Sun is in the North near the Tropic of Cancer, the Full Moon is in the South near the Tropic of Capricorn. The extreme North will not see the Full Moon rise or set throughout the day, as it is too far away.


I said I'd revisit this at the full moon.  Turns out I don't have to wait that long.  If Tom is correct, the moon would currently be north of 10 degrees latitude.  As such, a viewer at the equator today would need to look northward to see the rising moon.  As it turns out, an equitorial viewer needs to look south.

I had placed an Imgur image here but deleted it without thinking about the ramifications to my posts here.  Sorry for that


« Last Edit: December 04, 2020, 05:40:10 PM by WTF_Seriously »
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Offline Tom Bishop

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2020, 12:39:16 AM »
Nov 30, 2020 - Full Moon

Moon appears to the North at its apex in Equator. Also rises and sets in the North.

https://www.mooncalc.org/#/0,-78.0469,2/2020.11.30/00:00/1/3


Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2020, 12:46:58 AM »
Nov 30, 2020 - Full Moon

Moon appears to the North at its apex in Equator. Also rises and sets in the North.

https://www.mooncalc.org/#/0,-78.0469,2/2020.11.30/00:00/1/3



Thank you for that, Tom.  Always interested in learning.  I can see how I misinterpreted your two drawings as I try to further understand the FE model. And, admittedly, learn more about how things work.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2020, 01:05:20 AM by WTF_Seriously »
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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Moonrise-Moonset in northern lattitudes
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2020, 04:55:34 PM »
@Tom Bishop

Thank you for turning me onto the mooncalc site.  It has helped answer many questions I've been having.  As a side note. Your illustration of moon phasing in the Wiki is completely inaccurate.



It appears to show the sun and moon traveling in concentric orbits about the north pole.  I don't believe the FE model follows this as is evidenced by the two illustrations you presented. This has caused me great confusion in trying to understand the FE model.
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