Offline Action80

  • *
  • Posts: 1149
    • View Profile
Re: Ring laser gyros
« Reply #80 on: October 08, 2021, 12:03:16 PM »
Your referenced article debunks your 'relative motion' statement right from the start.  Scientists that study any seismic activity know that this is a very intermittent phenomenon. The very steady baseline rotation rate on the graph isn’t related to seismic activity at all, it’s the measured rotation of the earth.  You can see that there’s a deviation of the rate both above and below the steady baseline.  The sheer mass of the earth would preclude any sudden changes of the rotation rate like that.  You can take a gyroscope and put it on an airplane, and it will still be influenced by the earth’s rotation but couldn’t be influenced by any seismic activity.
RET claims the earth's rotation is affected by seismic activity so your statement makes zero sense.

*

Offline RonJ

  • *
  • Posts: 1877
  • ACTA NON VERBA
    • View Profile
Re: Ring laser gyros
« Reply #81 on: October 08, 2021, 01:37:22 PM »
My statement makes sense 100% because I just showed that a gyro will measure the earth's rotation minus any seismic activity.  You did state that the earth's rotation is affected by seismic activity, did you not?  I never disputed that fact.  Any affect is very intermittant and localized.  The earth's rotation always returns to the expected base rate very quickly.  If I was in China looking at a gyro on a ship I would never even observe any seismic activity on it if there was a huge earthquake in California, but we might get an alert to be on the lookout for a tsunami.
You can lead flat earthers to the curve but you can't make them think!

Offline SteelyBob

  • *
  • Posts: 524
    • View Profile
Re: Ring laser gyros
« Reply #82 on: October 08, 2021, 03:52:30 PM »
I think the important point here is that earth is, at a local level, essentially a rigid body, but in the global scale, it’s far from rigid. You have a series of tectonic plates, floating around on viscous material, with the whole thing rotating away. So if you measure the rate of rotation at a particular spot, you’ll get the aggregate rate of rotation, with any local seismic activity, or oscillatory motion, superimposed on top. Moreover, the entire system is changing slowly - the axis of rotation changes over time, and the whole thing wobbles slightly as well. It’s fascinating stuff, and amazing that we now have devices of such sensitivity.

What we see in all of the graphs, in all of the papers and websites that we’ve discussed so far, is absolutely aligned with that - it all points to the same thing.

*

Offline RonJ

  • *
  • Posts: 1877
  • ACTA NON VERBA
    • View Profile
Re: Ring laser gyros
« Reply #83 on: October 08, 2021, 04:34:45 PM »
The earth is like a large bell, held together with lots of rubber bands, that’s slowly rotating.  Occasionally one of the rubber bands slips and the pieces slap together and there’s a slight ringing sound heard.  The main points of this analogy are that the rotation is a separate phenomenon from the ringing.  The ringing could be compared to seismic activity.  This seismic activity could very intermittently have a small localized effect on the rotation rate, but that effect would quickly subside and be negligible after a short period of time.  The other interesting thing about this phenomenon is that scientists have been studying this for quite a while and have verified that the vibrations propagated out and the resonant frequency observed after an earthquake match that of a large spherical body.  If you want to get heavily into math you can confirm this for yourself in the zetetic way.


Another thought:  Think of yourself on a merry-go-round.  You have a gyroscope in your lap.  It will measure a steady rate of rotation.  Now if you suddenly move yourself backwards and forwards your gyroscope will measure a quick deviation in the rotation rate both positive and negative but the overall base rate will stay steady.  The deviations in the ring laser gyroscope would be simular to measuring your sudden movements in your seat that only adds or subtracts from the underlying rotation rate of the merry-go-round.  This is another illustration of the difference between the rotation of the earth and it's seismic activity.  These are two separate and distinct characteristics.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2021, 06:52:57 PM by RonJ »
You can lead flat earthers to the curve but you can't make them think!

Offline SteelyBob

  • *
  • Posts: 524
    • View Profile
Re: Ring laser gyros
« Reply #84 on: October 08, 2021, 07:02:19 PM »
Nicely put, thank you.