Offline RufusX

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How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« on: June 05, 2017, 08:02:36 AM »
At the exact moment that the sun sets in the West horizon for person A, it also rises on the East horizon for person B.   This is an endless chain that occurs throughout the planet.   

With a spherical earth model, the reason this happens is obvious.  However, (unless I am misunderstanding your theory), the spinning pancake model definitely does not explain this.   

How does the spinning pancake flat earth model, (or any other flat earth model), explain this?

Offline 3DGeek

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Re: How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2017, 03:37:46 PM »
At the exact moment that the sun sets in the West horizon for person A, it also rises on the East horizon for person B.   This is an endless chain that occurs throughout the planet.   

With a spherical earth model, the reason this happens is obvious.  However, (unless I am misunderstanding your theory), the spinning pancake model definitely does not explain this.   

How does the spinning pancake flat earth model, (or any other flat earth model), explain this?

If you read their Wiki - the FE'ers here don't believe that the flat earth spins.   Rather the sun moves around over the surface, casting it's light like a flashlight rather than in all directions.  We're told that some weird perspective effect causes sunsets, sunrises, moonsets and moonrises...I'm not happy with that answer - but that's a more subtle and nuanced question.

You REALLY need to read the Wiki before posting.
Hey Tom:  What path do the photons take from the physical location of the sun to my eye at sunset?

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Offline Toolazytomakeausername

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Re: How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2017, 02:08:14 PM »
All the answers to that are in the wiki. You really got to read that before posting.
According to all known laws of aviation, there is no way that a bee should be able to fly. Its wings are too small to get its fat little body off the ground. The bee, of course, flies anyways. Because bees don't care what humans think is impossible.

Offline Smokified

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Re: How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2017, 05:40:59 PM »
All the answers to that are in the wiki. You really got to read that before posting.

You should change your username to toolazytoreadthethreadbeforeposting.

The wiki is filled with about the finest quality BS you will find anywhere around the globe.

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Offline junker

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Re: How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 02:15:29 PM »
All the answers to that are in the wiki. You really got to read that before posting.

You should change your username to toolazytoreadthethreadbeforeposting.

The wiki is filled with about the finest quality BS you will find anywhere around the globe.

Hi there, please refrain from personal attacks and low-content posting in the upper fora. If you don't have anything useful to add to the thread, then please refrain from posting. If you want to complain about the wiki, then please do so in the Angry Ranting forum. Warned.

Re: How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2017, 01:56:07 AM »
At the exact moment that the sun sets in the West horizon for person A, it also rises on the East horizon for person B.   This is an endless chain that occurs throughout the planet.   

With a spherical earth model, the reason this happens is obvious.  However, (unless I am misunderstanding your theory), the spinning pancake model definitely does not explain this.   

How does the spinning pancake flat earth model, (or any other flat earth model), explain this?

To answer your question directly, look at the picture below. 
Imagine Person A is standing in New Zealand and sees the sun setting as it moves away to the West.  At the same time, Person B could be in Egypt and the Sun is rising as it approaches from the East.

The hallmark of true science is repeatability to the point of accurate prediction.

Offline 3DGeek

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Re: How do flat Earth-ers deal with this issue?
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2017, 03:06:02 PM »
To answer your question directly, look at the picture below. 
Imagine Person A is standing in New Zealand and sees the sun setting as it moves away to the West.  At the same time, Person B could be in Egypt and the Sun is rising as it approaches from the East.



That picture doesn't work.  The sun rises at the same time over (say) central Australia as it does over Japan and over Western Siberia.  Daytime in Australia is also daytime at either the North or the South pole (depending on time of year).   So the idea that the sun shines a pretty circle onto the Earth doesn't work.

Your picture shows the sun illuminating a roughly circular patch of the Earth - when in fact (if FET is correct) it should illuminate a shape roughly like a semi circle with it's center close to the North pole...that's the only way you can reconcile sunrise and sunset times around the world.

It's often described as shining onto the earth like a flashlight - but that's a very poor description.   It's a light source that shines a semicircular cross-section beam...which is much more weird than "like a flashlight".

So if it's noon in Australia - then the sun is where the red dot is on my map - but the area the sun has to illuminate MUST be a semi-circle:



If it's a circular pool of light - then you'd be able to see the sun at midnight in North America...setting on the Northern horizon (assuming you buy the FET stuff about weird laws of perspective and refraction in the atmosphere).
« Last Edit: July 06, 2017, 03:08:00 PM by 3DGeek »
Hey Tom:  What path do the photons take from the physical location of the sun to my eye at sunset?