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Offline stack

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2021, 06:49:01 PM »
@Brett500

Since you seem to think azimuth angles can disprove a theory, let's do a little exercise.
Considering he deleted his account 3 days ago, you might not have much luck.

Suppose not.

Just curious, is there an easy way to see if someone's account is still active?  Like a scarlet D for Douche Deleted or something.

You can tell it's inactive/deleted when it looks like this next to their posts:


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Offline WTF_Seriously

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2021, 06:52:56 PM »
@Brett500

Since you seem to think azimuth angles can disprove a theory, let's do a little exercise.
Considering he deleted his account 3 days ago, you might not have much luck.

Suppose not.

Just curious, is there an easy way to see if someone's account is still active?  Like a scarlet D for Douche Deleted or something.

You can tell it's inactive/deleted when it looks like this next to their posts:



Ahhhh.  Thanks.  My learning for the day is done.
Flat-Earthers seem to have a very low standard of evidence for what they want to believe but an impossibly high standard of evidence for what they don’t want to believe.

Lee McIntyre, Boston University

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Offline Pete Svarrior

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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2021, 07:19:52 PM »
Yeah, that's what a deleted account will look like. Missing post count, slightly lighter colour for the username, clicking on the username no longer takes you to a profile, no avatar (if there was one before), etc. Not "inactive", though, there is no such thing as an "inactive" account in our forum software.
Read the FAQ before asking your question - chances are we already addressed it.
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Re: Azimuth angles?
« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2021, 08:02:03 PM »
Just to clarify.

The question is reasonable: someone doesn't quite understand azimuths and RE theory.

The question was, why does the azimuth of sunrise always match the azimuth of sunset?  (Actually, the negative of it, but never mind that.)  It seems as though, if the Earth's axis is angled, the azimuths of these two events shouldn't be equal.

The reason why they're equal is simple: the Earth is a sphere, which is radially symmetrical.  Therefore, sunrise and sunset azimuths will be symmetrical about the plane between the Earth and the Sun.

Here's a little experiment you can use to verify and illustrate this.  Stand up straight and directly face a small light (or anything you can easily see in your peripheral vision) that's at roughly the height of your eyes.  Turn your head left and right until it disappears from view*.  You'll notice that (if you're reasonably symmetrical yourself, as most people are) that the light disappears at the same angle of head turn, left or right.  Now bow forward a bit and repeat the experiment.  You'll notice that the angle is less, but is still the same going right or left.  The same is true of sunrise and sunset azimuths, and for the same reason: the Earth, like your head, is radially symmetrical.

This works for both sphere and cylinder since they're both radially symmetrical, so, by this little experiment, the Earth could be a cylinder and provide similar results.  Of course, for a cylinder the azimuth table wouldn't vary by latitude.

* Ignoring blind spots -- if it disappears and then reappears as you turn further, that's a blind spot so ignore it.  As usual, it's hard to ignore a blind spot unless you're aware of it.