İntikam

I'm posting gore. So; What's happened relevant with ISI?

A news: EU respects results of Turkish referendum, High Rep. Mogherini says

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/eu-respects-results-of-turkish-referendum-high-rep-mogherini-says.aspx?pageID=238&nID=112553

She respect to result of the referendum.

Take a closer look to the new constitution provisions :

You should to read this article for understand what's happening in Turkey.

Quote
The recent constitutional referendum in Turkey does not seem important enough for most Americans to notice, but it will be big for the future of Europe and the Middle East. The referendum, which passed at approximately 51 to 48 percent, redraws much of the power in Turkey’s government. The reason it is important is that whether Turkey helps the rest of the west defeat ISIS and becomes a good, upstanding country is very much dependent on Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

In general, the constitutional referendum redefines Turkey’s government from a parliamentary system with a weak president (as compared to the United States system) to a presidential system with an executive with (presumably) more power than the president of the United States.

Specifically, the Turkish constitutional change will remove the office of Turkey’s prime minister and grant executive powers to its president. It creates new offices of vice presidents and transfers control over the cabinet to the president. Most of these changes are moving the country closer to a United States-like structure.

The concern from the opposition to the referendum is that some of the changes reduce the checks and balances previously set forth against Turkey’s president. In particular, the change to allow the president to be the head of a party (which decides who will run for specific governmental positions), in combination with Turkey’s simultaneous elections, could mean that the president can now hypothetically control who from his or her party is elected, thus making the president a de-facto authority over the parliament. Think of it this way: With the president in control of the parliament, he or she could limit additions to the government to include only the individuals who comply with his or her own agenda.

Fortunately, there is an added provision for judicial review of presidential actions. How much this judicial review will do, however, is presently unclear; after all, another change to the constitution gives the president the power to appoint Turkey’s judiciary. Regardless of whether one deems the concerns in the preceding paragraph as legitimate, the current fears Turkmen have over President Erdoğan’s corrupt government are objectively very real.

President Erdoğan is from the Turkish Justice and Development Party, which is more religiously-oriented (Islamist) than other parties. Turkey established itself as a secular state under its modern constitution, which even temporarily gave the military the power to enforce that secularism.

In the immediate response to the 2016 failed military coup d’état (when various parts of the Turkish military began defying orders and attempting to seize key Turkish cities in a failed attempt to overthrow the government and President Erdoğan), some people believed that the Turkish military was, by the coup, trying to further assert its secularism.

The exact reason for the coup d’état is still disputed; President Erdoğan’s official stance remains that the coup was started by the Gulenists, a movement named after Fethullah Gulen, a former imam and former ally of President Erdoğan. Gulen was living in the United States in Pennsylvania at the time of the coup, and he vehemently denounced it.

There even exist accusations that President Erdoğan organized the coup himself in order to gain more power, as immediately after the attempt, Erdoğan called a state of emergency. Importantly, in a Turkish state of emergency, the president inherits the authority to make arrests. Over the course of the several months since the coup and declared the state of emergency, tens of thousands of Turkmen have been arrested (most, but not all, were affiliated with the military or were politicians who were either involved or believed to be involved in the coup attempt). Furthermore, Amnesty International claimed that the government of Turkey was torturing prisoners and denying them adequate access to food and water.

In addition to all of the people arrested as a result of the coup, The Guardian reports that the Turkish government shut down three news outlets, 16 TV stations, 23 radio stations, 45 newspapers, 15 magazines, and 29 publishers. Taking drastic action against the press is concerning in an apparently democratic society where the freedom of the press is established, and the preceding statistics suggest that President Erdoğan intends to silence as much of the press as he can. This year was not the only time that President Erdoğan has arrested journalists, as American media have boomed with countless reports of media contributors’ arrests in Turkey.

Overall, Turkey has a higher number of journalists in prison than any other country: The Committee to Protect Journalists put Turkey’s number of journalists currently in prison for attempting to expose corruption at 81. The country with the next-highest number, with 38 journalists currently imprisoned for their careers, is China, which is typically seen as the most restrictive country against media efforts. In other words, during Turkey’s state of emergency, President Erdoğan has imprisoned nearly twice as many journalists as the country that is most associated with doing so. Ultimately, the Turkish coup d’état attempt of 2016 and the subsequent Turkish constitutional referendum draw questions about President Erdoğan’s goals. If Erdoğan sticks to maintaining moderate secularism for his country, he could be very valuable to the West, as he is currently fighting against ISIS. However, if the public’s fears that Erdoğan intends to move his country closer to a theocratic state are true, he could end up becoming another problem for the West.

https://www.mnrepublic.com/turkish-constitutional-referendum/

As we see that, this referendum convert Turkey to a middle age country. This is absolutely what is Suggested system by ISIS.

This system is clearly and completely demolishing democracy. In fact we rejected it. But the authority forced it with electoral tricks as %51 vs %49. This is a despotism. In this case, those who seize the majority in the country can constantly make constitutional amendments. This situation will cause chaos in the country, and it will cause Turkey to become Syria. In other words, In Turkey, structures such as ISIS will emerge and people will lose their heads. Another way of doing this is to immigrate tens of millions of Turks to Europe. Which will cause chaos in Europe.

Mogherini's talking about respect means, respect to ISIS, respect to kaos in Turkey, it means that millions of people die and their heads are cut off, respecting tens of millions, perhaps 50 million Turks asylum to Europe. Europe is now dangerously distant and does not know what it is. We feel that close in turkey. The streets are full of people hungry, mostly unemployed. They started to mafia. They are annoying  and disturbing women in beaches. They are begging in subway and the streets. They are occupied our beaches.





Soon turkey will be like syria. And europe, will be in place of Turkey.

Respect the results of the referendum means to respect of welcome tens of millions of refugees.

Also she respect as follows:


Is there anything here that might come to meanin of gore? No. Clearly "theflatearthsociety" (other forum" is supporting to ISIS, by supporting to Mogherini who an ISIS supporter.)


EDIT - Removed images breaking rule 7
  - junker
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 06:59:34 PM by İntikam »

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Offline crutonius

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I'm posting gore. So; What's happened relevant with ISI?



A news: EU respects results of Turkish referendum, High Rep. Mogherini says

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/eu-respects-results-of-turkish-referendum-high-rep-mogherini-says.aspx?pageID=238&nID=112553

She respect to result of the referendum.

Take a closer look to the new constitution provisions :

You should to read this article for understand what's happening in Turkey.

Quote
The recent constitutional referendum in Turkey does not seem important enough for most Americans to notice, but it will be big for the future of Europe and the Middle East. The referendum, which passed at approximately 51 to 48 percent, redraws much of the power in Turkey’s government. The reason it is important is that whether Turkey helps the rest of the west defeat ISIS and becomes a good, upstanding country is very much dependent on Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

In general, the constitutional referendum redefines Turkey’s government from a parliamentary system with a weak president (as compared to the United States system) to a presidential system with an executive with (presumably) more power than the president of the United States.

Specifically, the Turkish constitutional change will remove the office of Turkey’s prime minister and grant executive powers to its president. It creates new offices of vice presidents and transfers control over the cabinet to the president. Most of these changes are moving the country closer to a United States-like structure.

The concern from the opposition to the referendum is that some of the changes reduce the checks and balances previously set forth against Turkey’s president. In particular, the change to allow the president to be the head of a party (which decides who will run for specific governmental positions), in combination with Turkey’s simultaneous elections, could mean that the president can now hypothetically control who from his or her party is elected, thus making the president a de-facto authority over the parliament. Think of it this way: With the president in control of the parliament, he or she could limit additions to the government to include only the individuals who comply with his or her own agenda.

Fortunately, there is an added provision for judicial review of presidential actions. How much this judicial review will do, however, is presently unclear; after all, another change to the constitution gives the president the power to appoint Turkey’s judiciary. Regardless of whether one deems the concerns in the preceding paragraph as legitimate, the current fears Turkmen have over President Erdoğan’s corrupt government are objectively very real.

President Erdoğan is from the Turkish Justice and Development Party, which is more religiously-oriented (Islamist) than other parties. Turkey established itself as a secular state under its modern constitution, which even temporarily gave the military the power to enforce that secularism.

In the immediate response to the 2016 failed military coup d’état (when various parts of the Turkish military began defying orders and attempting to seize key Turkish cities in a failed attempt to overthrow the government and President Erdoğan), some people believed that the Turkish military was, by the coup, trying to further assert its secularism.

The exact reason for the coup d’état is still disputed; President Erdoğan’s official stance remains that the coup was started by the Gulenists, a movement named after Fethullah Gulen, a former imam and former ally of President Erdoğan. Gulen was living in the United States in Pennsylvania at the time of the coup, and he vehemently denounced it.

There even exist accusations that President Erdoğan organized the coup himself in order to gain more power, as immediately after the attempt, Erdoğan called a state of emergency. Importantly, in a Turkish state of emergency, the president inherits the authority to make arrests. Over the course of the several months since the coup and declared the state of emergency, tens of thousands of Turkmen have been arrested (most, but not all, were affiliated with the military or were politicians who were either involved or believed to be involved in the coup attempt). Furthermore, Amnesty International claimed that the government of Turkey was torturing prisoners and denying them adequate access to food and water.

In addition to all of the people arrested as a result of the coup, The Guardian reports that the Turkish government shut down three news outlets, 16 TV stations, 23 radio stations, 45 newspapers, 15 magazines, and 29 publishers. Taking drastic action against the press is concerning in an apparently democratic society where the freedom of the press is established, and the preceding statistics suggest that President Erdoğan intends to silence as much of the press as he can. This year was not the only time that President Erdoğan has arrested journalists, as American media have boomed with countless reports of media contributors’ arrests in Turkey.

Overall, Turkey has a higher number of journalists in prison than any other country: The Committee to Protect Journalists put Turkey’s number of journalists currently in prison for attempting to expose corruption at 81. The country with the next-highest number, with 38 journalists currently imprisoned for their careers, is China, which is typically seen as the most restrictive country against media efforts. In other words, during Turkey’s state of emergency, President Erdoğan has imprisoned nearly twice as many journalists as the country that is most associated with doing so. Ultimately, the Turkish coup d’état attempt of 2016 and the subsequent Turkish constitutional referendum draw questions about President Erdoğan’s goals. If Erdoğan sticks to maintaining moderate secularism for his country, he could be very valuable to the West, as he is currently fighting against ISIS. However, if the public’s fears that Erdoğan intends to move his country closer to a theocratic state are true, he could end up becoming another problem for the West.

https://www.mnrepublic.com/turkish-constitutional-referendum/

As we see that, this referendum convert Turkey to a middle age country. This is absolutely what is Suggested system by ISIS.

This system is clearly and completely demolishing democracy. In fact we rejected it. But the authority forced it with electoral tricks as %51 vs %49. This is a despotism. In this case, those who seize the majority in the country can constantly make constitutional amendments. This situation will cause chaos in the country, and it will cause Turkey to become Syria. In other words, In Turkey, structures such as ISIS will emerge and people will lose their heads. Another way of doing this is to immigrate tens of millions of Turks to Europe. Which will cause chaos in Europe.

Mogherini's talking about respect means, respect to ISIS, respect to kaos in Turkey, it means that millions of people die and their heads are cut off, respecting tens of millions, perhaps 50 million Turks asylum to Europe. Europe is now dangerously distant and does not know what it is. We feel that close in turkey. The streets are full of people hungry, mostly unemployed. They started to mafia. They are annoying  and disturbing women in beaches. They are begging in subway and the streets. They are occupied our beaches.





Soon turkey will be like syria. And europe, will be in place of Turkey.

Respect the results of the referendum means to respect of welcome tens of millions of refugees.

Also she respect as follows:


Is there anything here that might come to meanin of gore? No. Clearly "theflatearthsociety" (other forum" is supporting to ISIS, by supporting to Mogherini who an ISIS supporter.)

Whoa there!  That's a whole lot of information.  Why don't you explain to us what happened and then we can tell you what we think?

EDIT - Removed images from quote breaking rule 7
  - junker
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 02:10:20 PM by junker »

İntikam


Whoa there!  That's a whole lot of information.  Why don't you explain to us what happened and then we can tell you what we think?

This post is deleted  and I get banned  of it. So I'm sharing this post here. I'll share it at there when I'll return back. Or maybe I don't return that ISIS supported place if can be happy here. I don't ask for your ideas. They deleted my post that unmasked an ISIS supporter and I opened it in here. Because you can't stop releaving the truth!

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Offline junker

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Whoa there!  That's a whole lot of information.  Why don't you explain to us what happened and then we can tell you what we think?

This post is deleted  and I get banned  of it. So I'm sharing this post here. I'll share it at there when I'll return back. Or maybe I don't return that ISIS supported place if can be happy here. I don't ask for your ideas. They deleted my post that unmasked an ISIS supporter and I opened it in here. Because you can't stop releaving the truth!

While I don't necessarily think it is gore, some of those images are in violation of rule 7. You can post links to them with warnings that they may not be safe for viewing in public, but don't embed them into your post.
Please make sure to check out these resources to ensure that your time at tfes.org is enjoyable and productive.

1. The Rules

2. The FAQ

3. The Wiki

You're doing God's work, junker.

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Offline crutonius

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Whoa there!  That's a whole lot of information.  Why don't you explain to us what happened and then we can tell you what we think?

This post is deleted  and I get banned  of it. So I'm sharing this post here. I'll share it at there when I'll return back. Or maybe I don't return that ISIS supported place if can be happy here. I don't ask for your ideas. They deleted my post that unmasked an ISIS supporter and I opened it in here. Because you can't stop releaving the truth!

While I don't necessarily think it is gore, some of those images are in violation of rule 7. You can post links to them with warnings that they may not be safe for viewing in public, but don't embed them into your post.

Intikams rant here is a little misleading. These images are not what he posted to the other site. The pictures he posted there were significantly more brutal.

İntikam


Whoa there!  That's a whole lot of information.  Why don't you explain to us what happened and then we can tell you what we think?

This post is deleted  and I get banned  of it. So I'm sharing this post here. I'll share it at there when I'll return back. Or maybe I don't return that ISIS supported place if can be happy here. I don't ask for your ideas. They deleted my post that unmasked an ISIS supporter and I opened it in here. Because you can't stop releaving the truth!

While I don't necessarily think it is gore, some of those images are in violation of rule 7. You can post links to them with warnings that they may not be safe for viewing in public, but don't embed them into your post.

Intikams rant here is a little misleading. These images are not what he posted to the other site. The pictures he posted there were significantly more brutal.

The original post is deleted so I created a new one. It was not more brutal then this one. Supporting to ISIS is the brutal thing by itself.

You are snoop and missleading that although not necessary.

İntikam


Whoa there!  That's a whole lot of information.  Why don't you explain to us what happened and then we can tell you what we think?

This post is deleted  and I get banned  of it. So I'm sharing this post here. I'll share it at there when I'll return back. Or maybe I don't return that ISIS supported place if can be happy here. I don't ask for your ideas. They deleted my post that unmasked an ISIS supporter and I opened it in here. Because you can't stop releaving the truth!

While I don't necessarily think it is gore, some of those images are in violation of rule 7. You can post links to them with warnings that they may not be safe for viewing in public, but don't embed them into your post.

I do not think it is a rule violation. Only the truth is hurt you.

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Offline junker

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I do not think it is a rule violation. Only the truth is hurt you.

It is a rule violation. Also, please refrain from arguing moderation decisions in the same thread. If you disagree with something, you are welcome to post your concern in the aptly-named "Suggestions & Concerns" forum. Consider this a 2nd warning.
Please make sure to check out these resources to ensure that your time at tfes.org is enjoyable and productive.

1. The Rules

2. The FAQ

3. The Wiki

You're doing God's work, junker.

İntikam

I do not think it is a rule violation. Only the truth is hurt you.

It is a rule violation. Also, please refrain from arguing moderation decisions in the same thread. If you disagree with something, you are welcome to post your concern in the aptly-named "Suggestions & Concerns" forum. Consider this a 2nd warning.

It is not a rule violation. You do not understand what you read. When a decision is made, it is not necessary to discuss it with the authors. This is not "explanation", but "priggery".

How easy it is to warn when there is a competent. The fact that doesn't make you as a  "wise person". You act like a naughty child. You have competent and you use it. Now shut up or make your job what If some authorities give you permission to be arbitrary.

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Offline junker

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I do not think it is a rule violation. Only the truth is hurt you.

It is a rule violation. Also, please refrain from arguing moderation decisions in the same thread. If you disagree with something, you are welcome to post your concern in the aptly-named "Suggestions & Concerns" forum. Consider this a 2nd warning.

It is not a rule violation. You do not understand what you read. When a decision is made, it is not necessary to discuss it with the authors. This is not "explanation", but "priggery".

How easy it is to warn when there is a competent. The fact that doesn't make you as a  "wise person". You act like a naughty child. You have competent and you use it. Now shut up or make your job what If some authorities give you permission to be arbitrary.

Have a few days off to review the rules.
Please make sure to check out these resources to ensure that your time at tfes.org is enjoyable and productive.

1. The Rules

2. The FAQ

3. The Wiki

You're doing God's work, junker.

Yeah, totes with Junker here.

You can post links but not the full sized image.  Which would do the same thing for him so why he's getting bent out of shape is anyone's guess.

İntikam

I do not think it is a rule violation. Only the truth is hurt you.

It is a rule violation. Also, please refrain from arguing moderation decisions in the same thread. If you disagree with something, you are welcome to post your concern in the aptly-named "Suggestions & Concerns" forum. Consider this a 2nd warning.

It is not a rule violation. You do not understand what you read. When a decision is made, it is not necessary to discuss it with the authors. This is not "explanation", but "priggery".

How easy it is to warn when there is a competent. The fact that doesn't make you as a  "wise person". You act like a naughty child. You have competent and you use it. Now shut up or make your job what If some authorities give you permission to be arbitrary.

Have a few days off to review the rules.

I ignored you in the other forum.  :P

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Offline junker

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I ignored you in the other forum.  :P

Cool story, shill.
Please make sure to check out these resources to ensure that your time at tfes.org is enjoyable and productive.

1. The Rules

2. The FAQ

3. The Wiki

You're doing God's work, junker.

Offline Dionysios

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Erdogan is dictatorial, but the article in Cumhurriyet Daily News misunderstands the military.

I have many books on Turkey, but I will mention one that stands out as a one stop guide to understanding modern Turkey more than any other. It is a very well informed and balanced and perhaps Marxist oriented 350 page book entitled 'Turkey, A Modern History' by Erik Jan Zurcher that covers Turkish history from 1789 to the accession of Erdogan in 2002.

The Young Turks were a nationalist right-wing and secularist group that took power of the Ottoman Empire in a 1908 coup and has held it ever since. One of their members, Moustafa Kemal, secularised Turkey in the 1920's. The military has the been the citadel of secularism ever since.

This book has a chapter on the postwar resurgence of Islam which discerns two very different strands symbolised by two figures since the 1960's.

First, a genuine Muslim named Nesmitten Erbakan became the political leader of the movement which was always opposed by the military. Erbakan managed to become prime minister by the 1990's which was the high point of the movement. His relations with the military were always acrimonious, and his political party has since been banned. However, the military is who banned Erbakan's party. That is the view of the powerful minority, not the majority of the Turkish people.

Turkish writer Kemal Karpat wrote that the military's hold on power was gradually slipping as people turned away from secularism towards Islam. Therefore, he wrote, the military's 1980 coup d'état and imposition of military law would probably be their last opportunity since the secular military no longer has any popular basis of support in Turkey. Thus, if the secular pro-US Turkish military wanted to continue to be the power behind the throne, it would have to have a way of tapping into the resurgence of Islam as a basis of support.

Enter Alpaslan Turkes, in some ways the opposite of Erbakan. Zurcher writes that Turkes was a secularist at heart who collaborated with Nazism during WWII. He is famous as founder of the Grey Wolves, Turkey's right wing mafia that goes outside the law to do the things the military wants, but cannot do legally. Beginning about 1969, Turkes openly embraced Islam, not sincerely, but because the movement has had potential for garnering popular support.

The pro-American Turkish military needed an Islamic crony similar to Alpaslan Turkes, and Erdogan was their man. Thus, no surprise that Erdogan is supported by the likes of Donald Trump and groups like ISIS. 

Offline Dionysios

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Rajani Palme Dutt, himself half Indian, was arguably the ruling mind of the British communist party in the Stalin era and threw out its chief secretary taking that office himself in 1939 when the former failed to appreciate the wisdom of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact. 

Palme Dutt wrote a book in 1934 entitled 'Fascism' which has the deepest understanding of the phenomenon of any book I've come across and explains what is happening in Turkey.

Both fascism and bourgeois democracy (i.e. democracy for bourgeois liberals and not necessarily for others) are forms of capitalist government, instruments of the ruling capitalist class which prefers bourgeois democracy and generally resorts to fascism only when it perceives its own hold on power threatened.

Bourgeois democracy often casts fascism as an enemy in its propaganda, but the reality that they are made of the same fabric is evident to one who scratches the surface of the bourgeois democracy's white glove concealing the iron hand.

Bourgeois democracy chatacterized Weimar Germany whose regime let Hitler off with a light prison sentence while it treated communists very brutally. The same goes for liberal (yet anti-communist) governments in Italy and Spain which helped Mussolini and Franco to power. This also applies to Turkey and the United States. When the Grey Wolves have committed terrorist acts against leftists, they have historically been treated very leniently by the Turkish goverent as Zurcher duly notes in his excellent history of Turkey.