Why does the moon appear upside down in the south?
« on: April 28, 2017, 07:47:49 PM »
In the Wiki it says:

"Why does the moon look the same to everyone?

Q: Why does the moon and the phases look the same to everyone one earth regardless of where they are?

A: It doesn't. The phase you see varies depending on your location on earth. In FET this is explained by the different observers standing on either side of the moon. On one side it is right-side up, and on the other side it is upside down.

Imagine a green arrow suspended horizontally above your head pointing to the North. Standing 50 feet to the South of the arrow it is pointing "downwards" towards the Northern horizon. Standing 50 feet to the North of the arrow, looking back at it, it points "upwards" above your head to the North. The arrow flip-flops, pointing down or away from the horizon depending on which side you stand.
"

But let's say the top half of a 3D tubular arrow overhead was red and the bottom half was green (see the attached image of an arrow). Then no matter where I stood on a flat earth, I would still see the top half as red and the bottom half as green, even if the arrow seemed to be pointing up over my head instead of down towards the ground. I would still always see the top half of the arrow as being red. Or better yet, imagine a ball in the air overhead where the top half was red and the bottom half was green. Again, I would always see the top half of the ball as red and the bottom as green no matter which side of the ball I was on on a flat earth. Something like this but with green instead of white:


Now imagine a ball with four colors; red on top and green on the bottom on one side and blue on top and yellow on the bottom on the other side. Something like this but with only four bands of color:

As I moved around on the flat earth I should be able to see the red/green side from one direction and the blue-yellow side from the opposite direction

This does not happen when I view the moon. Instead the top and bottom halves switch in the southern hemisphere, and furthermore, there is not another side of the moon (equivalent to the blue/yellow side of the ball) with distinct features. The same features still appear but upside down:



Can anyone explain why the top and bottom of the moon switch places and why no one ever sees the other side of the moon in the flat earth model?
« Last Edit: April 28, 2017, 08:35:47 PM by Nirmala »

Re: Why does the moon appear upside down in the south?
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 05:27:14 PM »
Of course another possibility is that we only ever see the underside of the moon (i.e. the green or white part of the ball), but for that to be true on a flat earth, the moon would have to be a very far distance away....like say about 238,000 miles, and not rotating at all.

Otherwise if the moon was just 3000 miles up, we would see the upper red half of the ball from most locations other than right under the ball, because of the angle at which we would be looking at the moon.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 04:16:27 AM by Nirmala »

Re: Why does the moon appear upside down in the south?
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2017, 06:08:43 PM »
Because once you pass the moon that is overhead, don't you think it would appear differently?

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Re: Why does the moon appear upside down in the south?
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2017, 01:02:22 AM »
Because once you pass the moon that is overhead, don't you think it would appear differently?
So you are saying that we are only looking at the bottom of the moon regardless of location?  If it's only 3000 miles away how come you wouldn't see the other side of the moon at the extreme southern hemisphere?  In reality we all see the same side of the moon and see the same phase which suggests that it's farther away than 3000 miles.