Recent Posts

11
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Official Sports Thread
« Last post by Sean on Today at 04:32:08 AM »
Hmmm. Think this is Brady's last year, at least wth the patriots . They loaded up in free agency,  and not trading Jimmy G makes no sense if they plan on Brady being here more than a year or two? 
12
Flat Earth Q&A / Re: Upcoming Solar Eclipse in USA
« Last post by Tom Bishop on Today at 03:53:54 AM »
If the "dark object" also causes the lunar eclipses, then why does it not block out the stars in the sky surrounding the moon as it moves into position in front of the moon?

Apparently, this object only orbits the sun, shrouded in the sun's light in order to remain invisble to laymen eyes.

Is funny that this object is still a secret since we have in our power infrared telescopes that are able to take termal images of the celestial bodies.

Infrared observatories are only able to capture a very small section of the sky at a time when a picture is taken. Infrared telescopes don't see a large part of the sky. They are dishes which look at tiny sections of the sky, or are large deeply recessed observatory sized optical telescopes. And observatory telescopes don't "zoom out". It's like looking at the sky with a drinking straw. They are unreliable to catch something if you do not know where and when it will be.

This infrared sky map, for instance, was taken by stitching thousands of squares of sky together over a long period of time.
Yea.  Do you really believe that multiple  observatories that operate for years and do entire  surveys just keep missing objects that are large enough to block out the sun and moon?

Both the sun and moon have an angular size of 0.5 degrees. Not very big. Take a straw and spin around in circles outside and randomly point it in the sky and look through it and tell me what chances you think you have of looking at the sun or the moon.

Considering some of these observatories, a stirring straw may even be a more appropriate analogy.
13
Flat Earth General / Re: Boy, NASA sure has a lot of pics
« Last post by Nirmala on Today at 03:46:16 AM »
Cassini has sent back a total of 383,731 images. And I thought there were a lot of pictures from the Apollo mission. Someone should tell NASA that they are overdoing the fake pictures from space, as clearly they only needed 350,000 or so to make the mission look real ;)

https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/galleries/raw-images/
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I'm confused about the idea of the sun going under the horizon (or just disappearing) if the earth is flat. 
Two things strike me:
1) if the sun follows the laws of perspective it should get smaller and smaller as it moves towards the horizon. And because it's above the horizon, based on perspective, it should always stay above the horizon point but it should just get tiny until it is a point.  But it doesn't, it gets what seems to be twice as big as it gets closer to the horizon.
2) based on the concept that the sphere of light coming from the sun doesn't just shine in 360 degrees but is refracted downward into a cone shape - we get night and day on a flat earth instead of night-time just getting dimmer and dimmer.  Ok, got it.  But my understanding of a sunset is that if the earth is round, as it hits the edge on of the atmosphere it stretches the longer colors around the edge, making it look LARGER AND LARGER as it sets.  But based on the flat earth concept of light refraction, the sun isn't stretched at the edge, it's compressed!  Therefore, based on this concept, just like the sun gets BIGGER in round earth theory, the sun should get compressed and smaller and smaller as you reach the edge of day/night.   
So, not only should the sun get smaller and smaller as it sets based on perspective, it should also "look" even smaller, faster, as you reach the refractive edge.  It seems very counterintuitive to me to what I see at night and what FEers say is happening.  How does FE explain this?   
15
Flat Earth Q&A / Re: Upcoming Solar Eclipse in USA
« Last post by Flatout on Today at 12:39:09 AM »
If the "dark object" also causes the lunar eclipses, then why does it not block out the stars in the sky surrounding the moon as it moves into position in front of the moon?

Apparently, this object only orbits the sun, shrouded in the sun's light in order to remain invisble to laymen eyes.

Is funny that this object is still a secret since we have in our power infrared telescopes that are able to take termal images of the celestial bodies.

Infrared observatories are only able to capture a very small section of the sky at a time when a picture is taken. Infrared telescopes don't see a large part of the sky. They are dishes which look at tiny sections of the sky, or are large deeply recessed observatory sized optical telescopes. And observatory telescopes don't "zoom out". It's like looking at the sky with a drinking straw. They are unreliable to catch something if you do not know where and when it will be.

This infrared sky map, for instance, was taken by stitching thousands of squares of sky together over a long period of time.
Yea.  Do you really believe that multiple  observatories that operate for years and do entire  surveys just keep missing objects that are large enough to block out the sun and moon?   
16
Flat Earth Q&A / Re: Upcoming Solar Eclipse in USA
« Last post by Tom Bishop on April 27, 2017, 11:36:32 PM »
If the "dark object" also causes the lunar eclipses, then why does it not block out the stars in the sky surrounding the moon as it moves into position in front of the moon?

Apparently, this object only orbits the sun, shrouded in the sun's light in order to remain invisble to laymen eyes.

Is funny that this object is still a secret since we have in our power infrared telescopes that are able to take termal images of the celestial bodies.

Infrared observatories are only able to capture a very small section of the sky at a time when a picture is taken. Infrared telescopes don't see a large part of the sky. They are dishes which look at tiny sections of the sky, or are large deeply recessed observatory sized optical telescopes. And observatory telescopes don't "zoom out". It's like looking at the sky with a drinking straw. They are unreliable to catch something if you do not know where and when it will be.

This infrared sky map, for instance, was taken by stitching thousands of squares of sky together over a long period of time.
17
Technology & Information / Re: Soooo, I may have broken my laptop
« Last post by Lord Dave on April 27, 2017, 09:53:40 PM »
$250?  Yeah... any repair shop would charge you closer to $500.

Get a new one, swap the HDDs and call it a day.
18
Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Further Abuse by Junker.
« Last post by junker on April 27, 2017, 08:31:53 PM »
So, when he cannot win an argument, he accuses me of abusing the report feature, which I did not do, deletes the entire argument in question,  and further acts like the good little Stalin that he has proven himself to be. Good boy. In reality, you are a piece of shit. Lets just be honest and admit it.


Hi there, friend. First, your posts were not deleted, they were simply moved to Angry Ranting where they belong, along with your other overly-emotional posts. Second, please refrain from personal insults in the upper fora. I will remind you again that your next ban will be a month-long one. Take care!

Thread locked.
19
Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Further Abuse by Junker.
« Last post by SexWarrior on April 27, 2017, 08:31:34 PM »
Not usually the language I'd use in S&C, but I hope I'll be forgiven on this occasion.

*ahem*

Jesus Christ, fuck off you absolute baby.
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Suggestions & Concerns / Further Abuse by Junker.
« Last post by Poseidon on April 27, 2017, 08:27:44 PM »
So, when he cannot win an argument, he accuses me of abusing the report feature, which I did not do, deletes the entire argument in question,  and further acts like the good little Stalin that he has proven himself to be. Good boy. In reality, you are a piece of shit. Lets just be honest and admit it.