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Offline Snupes

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #300 on: January 23, 2017, 12:56:23 AM »
Been reading American Gods by Neil Gaiman. I'm only about halfway through, but it's fantastic. A slow burn, for sure, but it feels more like a living, breathing world than the vast majority of books I've read.
I love Neil Gaiman. I haven't read this one yet, but it was next on my list.
Shamefully, I've yet to finish. I've basically only been reading it on breaks at work, and I just took a week off work lol. Now time to try to finish it...


Cormac McCarthy - The Road
Write up a lil review if you don't mind, or at least let me know what you think. People keep telling me to read this.
Quote from: garygreen date=1480782226
i also took an online quiz that said i was a giraffe.  and i guess you're dumb enough to believe that i must be because the internet said so.

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Offline Jura-Glenlivet

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #301 on: January 23, 2017, 02:01:42 PM »

Bleak! Dystopian! Loved it.
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

No one infers a god from the simple, from the known, from what is understood, but from the complex, the unknown, and the incomprehensible. Our ignorance is God; what we know is science. Robert Green Ingersoll

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Offline rooster

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #302 on: January 23, 2017, 02:51:42 PM »
I remember really liking The Road.

Short, grim, haunting, dystopian - all good things. Not overly complicated, it doesn't go into too many details about what happened, just the perspective of a dad dealing with the aftermath. I think I cried a couple times at least.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2017, 02:53:23 PM by rooster »

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #303 on: January 23, 2017, 05:45:12 PM »
Cormac McCarthy - The Road
Write up a lil review if you don't mind, or at least let me know what you think. People keep telling me to read this.

I think it's a really beautiful book. I won't say any more than that, I think it is well worth discovering for yourself.
I've never seen the show, but just from reading the synopses on Wikipedia and articles like these, I can tell I'd hate it.

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Offline Crudblud

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #304 on: January 23, 2017, 10:42:11 PM »
Philip Roth - The Human Stain
I've never seen the show, but just from reading the synopses on Wikipedia and articles like these, I can tell I'd hate it.

Elusive Rabbit

Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #305 on: January 25, 2017, 01:49:53 PM »
Re-read Cormac McCarthy's The Road recently. I agree with the sentiments posted here about this book.

I also will say that it is one of the most strangely heart-warming books ever, past the pounding and wrenching surface. Through the chaotic terror, abject hopelessness, and senseless violence of the ruined world, the man's and the boy's world stays intact-- one of love between a father and son.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2017, 10:54:28 PM by Elusive Rabbit »

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Offline Jura-Glenlivet

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #306 on: January 25, 2017, 10:26:32 PM »

Well I just read a damn good novel.

China Mieville's -Perdido Street Station.

If you like your cities a mashed up steampunk version of Gormenghast, a baroque Sin city with aliens, low sorcery and valve driven robots? Visit China's New Crobuzon. If you like your stories and hero's clear cut and tied up nicely at the end, don't. 
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

No one infers a god from the simple, from the known, from what is understood, but from the complex, the unknown, and the incomprehensible. Our ignorance is God; what we know is science. Robert Green Ingersoll

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Offline Jura-Glenlivet

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #307 on: February 04, 2017, 08:13:31 PM »

Another grand book!

Marlon James – A brief history of seven killings

a Booker prize winner, not necessarily a good thing (too much Ian McEwan), but it's really good.
Based mainly in Jamaica on the politically motivated gangs and the attempted assassination of Bob Marley, through to the New York crack wars, told through a multitude of characters; Gangsters, journalists, CIA even a Ghost, cracking read.

A warning, the Jamaican slang will get into your head, so when I saw wan of the sistren working for the shitstem, selling cheese in Waitrose, I and I go over and me say, quiet like “Babylon fallin” well she spit her drink all apon me face an start to choke, but she got it..am sure she got it. Rastafari.
Just to be clear, you are all terrific, but everything you say is exactly what a moron would say.

No one infers a god from the simple, from the known, from what is understood, but from the complex, the unknown, and the incomprehensible. Our ignorance is God; what we know is science. Robert Green Ingersoll

Elusive Rabbit

Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #308 on: February 07, 2017, 02:01:33 AM »
Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children.

Offline Dionysios

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #309 on: February 11, 2017, 06:22:06 AM »
'Inside the Myth: Orwell
- Views From the Left'

I bought this last summer and just now getting time to read it a bit. A compilation of essays published back in 1984 by various writers all criticising different aspects of George Orwell.

It's agreeable, but too much for me to read straight through. I'll read one topic at a time & come back to it. Good thing the book is organised the way it is.

I discovered it in an essay by the Anglo-Indian writer Joti Brar about Orwell's involvement with British government surveillance of British citizens including Orwell's authorship of an infamous list of names of activists and left writers to be spied upon.

https://stalinsociety.net/2016/07/12/george-orwell/

And I was totally ignorant of that aspect of Orwell. It's striking to similar information I earlier discovered about Bertrand Russell, another well known "left" anti-communist.

Offline Dionysios

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #310 on: March 16, 2017, 08:57:24 PM »
'Black Bolshevik,
Autobiography of an Afro-American Communist'

By Harry Haywood (1978)

http://ouleft.org/wp-content/uploads/Harry-Haywood-Black-Bolshevik.pdf

This book is good for many reasons, but the perspective it has makes it trump all other books covering American society in the early twentieth century.

Its view of the Harlem Renaissance and black American society generally including solid knowledgeable criticisms of the Garvey movement and of the NAACP & Urban League and the role their leaders have played in making black Americans conformist.

It's also the best history of the Communist Party USA including deep insight into its degeneration in the 1950's through personal experience. 

The author is quite aware of racial issues & admirably consistently places them lower than class differences as he believed race is manipulated to divide the exploited class against itself which serves to maintain its weakness. 

The author was radical and well read believing the overthrow of American government and its financial owners and the division of its land through redistribution to finish what post civil war reconstruction failed to accomplish is the ultimate answer to america's problems.

EDIT:
The author advocates revolution, not reform because he believes the American system is evil root and branch. Most of its defenders have been conditioned by schools and other propaganda methods to fight against their own class interests much like those poor common people who chose to serve or collaborate with fascism in Nazi Germany or the Confederate South. Harry Haywood's ideas are much more well thought out and sophisticated than the neo-communist movement of the 60's and 70's.

I have read that this author became a mentor of Malcolm X when he was trying to find his was after leaving the Nation of Islam.

It's worth mentioning that Haywood had a negative view of Roosevelt and the New Deal as being the saviours of capitalism and the American system. This is a striking difference of old left communists from American Democrats who are the old party of slavery that transformed its image into the saviour of capitalism in the 1930's. This book shows the ugly side of the New Deal and the heritage of the Democrat party in the 1930's South. One gets a sharp understanding from the author's life as a communist organiser in the U.S. (both North and South), and this is complemented by events in the Soviet Union where the author attended the Lenin School from 1925 to 1929.

For my purpose's, this book's communist perspective is somewhat like Russia Today in that it helps place the rhetoric of American Democrats such as the anti-Russian stances of Bill Maher and Anderson Cooper in a critical perspective without having to rely on the media of American Republicans which merely offer a different variety of fascism.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2017, 12:12:51 AM by Dionysios »

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Online Ghost Spaghetti

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Re: FES Book Club
« Reply #311 on: March 20, 2017, 02:19:05 PM »
Currently reading Millenium People by J.G.Ballard. As one of his last books, it definitely feels more mature than the likes of High Rise or [/I]Concrete Island[/I]. it continues the same Ballardian theme of the middle classes seething with boredom and longing for a chance to release their animal passions, but here the radicalised middle-class actually seem to have some legitimate grievances to air, the descent into violence feels natural, even expected, in a way that it didn't in earlier works. I'm enjoying it so far.