For example, during the Red Bull Jump, Felix was up 128k feet and it seems so dark.  I am new to the flat earth theory - but even then I thought "wait, how is it darker up there than it is down below on earth if the sun is 95 MILLION miles away .... Shouldn't all of space be brightly lit"???  This has always baffled me.  So - if the earth IS flat and our sun and moon are local to us ....how far up ARE they? and ....why is it dark(er) at 128k feet??? ??? ???

The light interacts with our atmosphere to make it visible.

Not only do you need a source of light, but objects to reflect/absorb/scatter the light are also necessary to be perceived by the human eye.

In the case of "space," there are essentially no "objects," present to reflect/absorb/scatter light.

Offline model 29

  • *
  • Posts: 317
    • View Profile
For example, during the Red Bull Jump, Felix was up 128k feet and it seems so dark.  I am new to the flat earth theory - but even then I thought "wait, how is it darker up there than it is down below on earth if the sun is 95 MILLION miles away .... Shouldn't all of space be brightly lit"???  This has always baffled me.  So - if the earth IS flat and our sun and moon are local to us ....how far up ARE they? and ....why is it dark(er) at 128k feet??? ??? ???
He was lit up quite well by the sun.  Space is brightly lit, but you (or the camera) will only see the light that is entering your eyes or the sensor.  If neither of those is looking at the source, or an object reflecting light, then it will see 'black'.  The sky is 'bright' at ground level because the blue end of the visible spectrum is scattered.  With a small fraction of atmosphere at his elevation when he jumped, no where near as much light is scattered.  The only light entering the camera is from the ground below, Felix, and the capsule.  The sun too if the camera is pointed at it.