Recent Posts

91
Flat Earth Q&A / Re: Question about the motion of the Moon
« Last post by PurpleCaracal on August 23, 2017, 09:02:11 AM »
From what I've gathered:

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There has to be a force acting on the Moon to cause it to dip below the Sun since they normally share the same orbital height.
They don't share the same orbital height - at least not always, and not exactly.
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The Moon should look larger when it is closer to us and yet it doesn't.
Yes, it would look larger, but since the Sun and Moon are rather small to begin with, and the variations in altitude are not that big either, that's neglegible.
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How is it that the Moon and Sun haven't collided?
Why would they collide?
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If the Sun and Moon orbit each other, what would ever cause the Moon to dip below and move across the Sun? That would be like the Moon dipping below the south pole and coming up the other side in the round Earth scenario.
The forces affecting the Sun and the Moon are mostly unknown. There's other theories though, for example the Shadow Object passing between the Sun and the Earth.

92
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« Last post by SexWarrior on August 23, 2017, 09:01:05 AM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-41003929

The meme president gives no shits about your health advisories. Ain't no sun fuck with Trump.



http://v.omgomg.eu/blindtrump.mp4
93
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« Last post by Lord Dave on August 23, 2017, 08:11:18 AM »
The way I remember being taught, it's dangerous to look at an eclipse because, although there's still dangerous levels of UV light, because it's dark your irises don't contract so the cornea gets burnt.

http://www.physlink.com/education/askexperts/ae586.cfm

And I'm wrong, you're right.
94
Philosophy, Religion & Society / Re: Trump
« Last post by Ghost Spaghetti on August 23, 2017, 08:07:21 AM »
The way I remember being taught, it's dangerous to look at an eclipse because, although there's still dangerous levels of UV light, because it's dark your irises don't contract so the cornea gets burnt.
95
What if the solar eclipse is a part of a sun hologram, and the sun is definitely an interactive hologram!
96
Suggestions & Concerns / Re: Nesting Tags Inside Spoiler Tags
« Last post by SexWarrior on August 23, 2017, 07:44:09 AM »
There's a minor issue with this - using underlines in spoilers appears to break while editing the post.



It seems to have to do with line 515 of our main CSS file. It's far from a big issue, but the disconnect between the post preview and the actual post could cause some confusion (as it did in my case - I originally posted here to say that underlines within spoiler tags are bork)
97
Flat Earth General / Re: Flat Earth Expedition to Antartica
« Last post by JHelzer on August 23, 2017, 06:12:25 AM »
Make sure you go in December so you can see the Sun spin around the horizon.  Then you can come back to tell us all about how cool that was.  I've seen it in the north during the summer when I lived in Sweden.  I also saw the opposite in the winter when the Sun only just popped over the horizon for 3 hours per day.  Amazing, but not great.  Really, really cold.
Good luck on your expedition.
98
Except when it's an annular solar eclipse.

Excellent point. 


How can the annular solar eclipse be explained by a FE model where the Sun and Moon are the same size?
99
Arts & Entertainment / Re: Superhero Movies & Comics General
« Last post by Snupes on August 23, 2017, 05:56:13 AM »
I want to vomit just reading that.
100
I think you know the answer to that question.  FE claims there is no real FE map, and that diagrams in the Wiki are just examples.  What I wonder is how is the Wiki the end all when people say to read it, but when you quote it you are told that it's only for examples.

I've seen what TomInAustin is talking about happen before on this message board, but am hoping it won't happen this time.  Can someone point me to a more detailed description of the moon's motion relative to the Earth and Sun?  I'd like to see a description, diagram, or animation that shows how the moon cycles through its phases and how it periodically ends up on the same side as the sun to enable a solar eclipse.