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Offline Saturn

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Why can't I see the sun?
« on: February 15, 2017, 10:29:03 PM »
I get why you would be able to see the moon in daylight but what about the sun at night?

Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2017, 11:12:46 PM »
Because it's far away

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Offline Saturn

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Huh?
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2017, 11:27:42 PM »
Are you a REr or a FEr? I can't tell by that post

Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2017, 11:30:36 PM »
Because it's far away

The other stars are further away but we can clearly see them. It's almost like somethings blocking our view of it haha...

Re: Huh?
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2017, 05:36:06 PM »
Are you a REr or a FEr? I can't tell by that post

Only interested in Truth. Either way you look at it the Sun is really far away.

Because it's far away

The other stars are further away but we can clearly see them. It's almost like somethings blocking our view of it haha...

Well FE theory, as far as I know, doesn't consider the Sun a star. Besides knowing that there are blinking lights in the sky, we really don't know what, or how far away, stars are.

Could very well be an atmospheric phenomenon.

One interesting theory I've seen is that the magnetic north pole behaves like a mirror ball and scatters the light from the sun onto our ionosphere. From the perspective of the observer, in their relative position, the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun. That is true on FE and RE.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Huh?
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2017, 12:12:55 PM »
From the perspective of the observer, in their relative position, the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun. That is true on FE and RE.

Yes, "the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun", but just why is it that:
          the stars appear to rotate once in 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.0916 seconds (or 23.9344699 hours, called a sidereal day) but
          the sun appear to rotate, on average, once in 24 hours (called a solar day). So a sidereal day is 0.9972696 mean solar days.

And those numbers are connected is a "strange way".
A year is 365.2422 days and 365.2422/(365.2422 + 1) = 0.9972696, which just "happens" to be the sidereal day as a fraction of a mean solar day.

Now on the globe, this is not a coincidence, there is a perfectly good reason for it,
but what is the reason for this apparent coincidence on the Flat Earth? Why is there this relationship between the period of rotation of the sun and the stars over out head?


Re: Huh?
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2017, 05:23:48 PM »
From the perspective of the observer, in their relative position, the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun. That is true on FE and RE.

Yes, "the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun", but just why is it that:
          the stars appear to rotate once in 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.0916 seconds (or 23.9344699 hours, called a sidereal day) but
          the sun appear to rotate, on average, once in 24 hours (called a solar day). So a sidereal day is 0.9972696 mean solar days.

And those numbers are connected is a "strange way".
A year is 365.2422 days and 365.2422/(365.2422 + 1) = 0.9972696, which just "happens" to be the sidereal day as a fraction of a mean solar day.

Now on the globe, this is not a coincidence, there is a perfectly good reason for it,
but what is the reason for this apparent coincidence on the Flat Earth? Why is there this relationship between the period of rotation of the sun and the stars over out head?

What are called stars and the Sun and the Moon occupy different parts of the firmament.

Re: Huh?
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2017, 06:04:10 PM »
Are you a REr or a FEr? I can't tell by that post

Only interested in Truth. Either way you look at it the Sun is really far away.

Because it's far away

The other stars are further away but we can clearly see them. It's almost like somethings blocking our view of it haha...

Well FE theory, as far as I know, doesn't consider the Sun a star. Besides knowing that there are blinking lights in the sky, we really don't know what, or how far away, stars are.

Could very well be an atmospheric phenomenon.

One interesting theory I've seen is that the magnetic north pole behaves like a mirror ball and scatters the light from the sun onto our ionosphere. From the perspective of the observer, in their relative position, the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun. That is true on FE and RE.

They have no evidence to say the Sun is not a star, you can't just say you know what I don't think 2+2=4 I'm gonna say it's 6 now, sorry that's not how science/math works. You only don't know what those blinking lights in the sky are unless you think all astrologists in the world are apart of some dumb conspiracy...

From the perspective of the observer, in their relative position, the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun. That is true on FE and RE.

Yes, "the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun", but just why is it that:
          the stars appear to rotate once in 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.0916 seconds (or 23.9344699 hours, called a sidereal day) but
          the sun appear to rotate, on average, once in 24 hours (called a solar day). So a sidereal day is 0.9972696 mean solar days.

And those numbers are connected is a "strange way".
A year is 365.2422 days and 365.2422/(365.2422 + 1) = 0.9972696, which just "happens" to be the sidereal day as a fraction of a mean solar day.

Now on the globe, this is not a coincidence, there is a perfectly good reason for it,
but what is the reason for this apparent coincidence on the Flat Earth? Why is there this relationship between the period of rotation of the sun and the stars over out head?

What are called stars and the Sun and the Moon occupy different parts of the firmament.

Isn't that heaven? So, no nothing we can physically see or travel to would be part of the firmament.

Re: Huh?
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2017, 06:10:56 PM »
Isn't that heaven?
No.
So, no nothing we can physically see or travel to would be part of the firmament.

Are you a firmament expert?

Considering your assumption the firmament = heaven, I would venture the answer to that question is a resounding NO.

Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2017, 06:13:47 PM »
In the Christian religion the firmament is heaven.

Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2017, 06:30:54 PM »
In the Christian religion the firmament is heaven.
Obviously erroneous interpretation of what is being communicated in Genesis.

Aside from the fact that Enoch was stated to be translated by God and brought to a heaven, Paul wrote of multiple heavens, etc.

Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2017, 08:18:07 PM »
If you go by the definition: the vault or arch of the sky, then yes everything outside of our atmosphere is outside of the firmament.

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Offline junker

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Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2017, 08:32:55 PM »
You only don't know what those blinking lights in the sky are unless you think all astrologists in the world are apart of some dumb conspiracy...

Why would there be a conspiracy of glorified fortune tellers?
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Re: Why can't I see the sun?
« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2017, 08:45:25 PM »
You only don't know what those blinking lights in the sky are unless you think all astrologists in the world are apart of some dumb conspiracy...

Why would there be a conspiracy of glorified fortune tellers?

Sorry, meant astronomer.

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Offline rabinoz

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Re: Huh?
« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2017, 10:01:30 PM »
From the perspective of the observer, in their relative position, the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun. That is true on FE and RE.

Yes, "the rotation of our Stars is intrinsically linked to the perceived rotation of our Sun", but just why is it that:
          the stars appear to rotate once in 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.0916 seconds (or 23.9344699 hours, called a sidereal day) but
          the sun appear to rotate, on average, once in 24 hours (called a solar day). So a sidereal day is 0.9972696 mean solar days.

And those numbers are connected is a "strange way".
A year is 365.2422 days and 365.2422/(365.2422 + 1) = 0.9972696, which just "happens" to be the sidereal day as a fraction of a mean solar day.

Now on the globe, this is not a coincidence, there is a perfectly good reason for it,
but what is the reason for this apparent coincidence on the Flat Earth? Why is there this relationship between the period of rotation of the sun and the stars over out head?

What are called stars and the Sun and the Moon occupy different parts of the firmament.
Really? Now where does it say that in "the Wiki"?

But, I cannot see the slightest connection between what you claimed and the question I asked. Do you even read the posts you reply to?
You answer "What are called stars and the Sun and the Moon occupy different parts of the firmament." has no connection to the lengths of a solar day, a sidereal day and a year.

What I asked was:
"Now on the globe, this is not a coincidence, there is a perfectly good reason for it,
but what is the reason for this apparent coincidence on the Flat Earth? Why is there this relationship between the period of rotation of the sun and the stars over out head?"

Because that relationship is real and has been known quite accurately for many centuries.